Depression And Anxiety In Teens Is Linked To Insomnia

By on July 31, 2014

A new study has highlighted the link between insomnia and related mental disorders found in teens. Results of this study may help in clinical treatment of teens that have sleep problems and mental disorders.

This study is conducted by psychology researchers from University of Adelaide. Results of this study are published in journal named Sleep Medicine. This study was conducted by Mr. Pasquale Alvaro PhD student from School of Psychology.

Insomnia - Depression And Anxiety In TeensFor this study Mr. Alvaro surveyed more than 300 Australian high school students within the age group 12 to 18 to understand their sleeping habits, their mental health condition, and particular time in which they are fully active in a day known as their chronotype.

Mr. Alvaro said that people who are suffering from insomnia find it difficult to fall asleep or stay asleep every night.

He also said that insomnia is most commonly found sleep disorder and 11% of teen aged between 13 and 16 years from most of the countries suffers from insomnia in some stage of their life.

He also said that presently there is a growing awareness among the people of scientific community about the relationship between insomnia, depression, and anxiety and also that these health conditions have overlapping risk factors related to neurobiological, psychological, and social.

Mr. Alvaro said that if person suffering from depression or anxiety also have insomnia, then insomnia worsens the condition and it can even result to other conditions like alcohol consumption, drug abuse during adolescence.

Through this study, Mr. Alvaro found out that insomnia is independently associated with mental conditions like depression, generalized anxiety disorder, and panic disorder in teens.

According to this study, insomnia and depression is found in teens that were more active during evening hours.

And these teens are also more prone to develop other mental disorders like obsessive compulsive disorder, social phobia, and separation anxiety. However, these disorders are mostly not independently associated to insomnia.

Mr. Alvaro said that being more active in evening, i.e. eveningness chronotype is an independent risk factor for developing insomnia and depression.

This is an important aspect as most of the adolescents prefer evening, which can sometimes become a syndrome that will make them to keep delaying their sleep time.

From the evidence collected by the study, while preventing and treating insomnia and depression, combination of mental disorders, sleeping habits, and eveningness chronotype should be considered along with presently obtained behavioral therapies.

And even while preventing and treating anxiety and its subtypes, insomnia and depression should also taken into consideration.