Internal Biological Clock Is Influenced By What We Eat

By on July 15, 2014

According to a new research study food what we eat not only nourishes our body, but also shows its effect on our internal biological clock. This biological clock regulates daily rhythm of many biological and behavioral aspects of our body.

This study was published in the Cell Press journal Cell Reports. This study provides a new insight about how internal biological clock can be adjusted by manipulating diet, which can be helpful to various health conditions. And study also shows that insulin is responsible for resetting of internal clock

What is Internal Biological Clock?

Internal Biological ClockInternal biological clock is also known as circadian clock. It is a biological clock, which plays an important role in sleeping timing, peak alertness timing, and timing for certain physiological processes.

Maximum expression of genes is enabled due to this clock during specific times of the day. A person’s adaptation towards the rotation of earth is also done by this clock.

Dr. Makoto Akashi is the lead of this study, and he is from Yamaguchi University, in Japan. Dr. Makoto Akashi said that when chronic de-synchronization of physiological rhythm and environmental rhythm occurs, it not only shows effect on physiological performance, but also results in increasing the risk of many health conditions like sleep disorders, diabetes, heart diseases, and cancer.

Basically there are two major paths involved with circadian clock. Firstly, it is the response to the exposure of light, which is well characterized. Secondly, it is the response to the food we eat, which is less understood.

Dr. Makoto Akashi and his colleagues of this study, from the experiments in cells and mice have found out that insulin, which is produced by pancreas, is secreted in response to feeding, and it may also responsible for resetting of circadian clock.

Dr. Makoto Akashi said that phase adjustment of circadian clock in feeding related tissues that is caused due insulin may enable the synchronization of mealtime and functioning of tissues. This synchronization results in effective digestion, and proper absorption. In short, insulin may be responsible for synchronization of stomach clock and mealtime.

Findings of this study provide valuable information on how circadian clock of body can be adjusted with manipulation of diet.

Dr. Makoto Akashi said that adjusting of circadian clock can be helpful in certain health conditions, such as Jet lag. To overcome jet lag, having a dinner that includes foods that promote insulin secretion is to be taken. As a result, secreted insulin advances a phase of circadian clock.

Findings of the study also suggest that this technique of adjusting circadian clock will not work properly in type 2 diabetic patients. Moreover, there may be many side effects involved in adjusting circadian clock with insulin in these patients.